FAQ's About Gunsmithing

 

 Topic - Cleaning  
Q -How often should I clean my firearm? A - Every time you shoot the firearm, a minimum cleaning with a bore snake or coated rod and mop should be done.  Every 500 to 1000 rounds the firearm should be taken to a qualified gunsmith for thorough cleaning and a close inspection.
Q- Is a gunsmith cleaning different than what I can do? A - Generally, yes.  A qualified gunsmith will take down the firearm to its individual components and thoroughly clean, lubricate, and inspect all parts.  The gunsmith will also look for any parts with undo wear or fatigue.
Q- Where do I get the right products to clean my firearm? A - There are various products available, however it is important that you use the correct product for the firearm.  Finishes, metals, etc should be cleaned and treated with the proper products.  Consult with Ozark's Gunsmithing for the correct products to use on your firearm.
   
 Topic - Old Firearms and Family Heirlooms  
Q- I have a old firearm that has been handed down through the family.  Is there anything that can be done to make it look better and last for future family? A - Absolutely.  At Ozarks Gunsmithing we have a process we call "Refurb".  This process allows the firearm to keep its antique condition while removing rust, corrosion,  nicks, scratches, etc.  Once this is complete we prepare the firearm for display or long term storage. We can also repair the firearm so that it is in shootable condition.
Q- I have an old firearm that I wish to restore back to its original condition. Can Ozarks Gunsmithing do that? A - Yes.  This is the process we call "Restoration".  The firearm is complete re-worked including wood, metals and coating, parts replacement and repair.  This process returns the firearm to or near like new condition and ready to shoot. Once this is complete we prepare the firearm for display or long term storage.
   
 Topic - Old Shooting Firearms  
Q- I have an old firearm that I would like to be made like new for target or game hunting.  What can Ozarks Gunsmithing do for me? A - The process you are referring to is called "Restoration". The firearm is complete re-worked including wood, metals and coating, parts replacement and repair.  This process returns the firearm to or near like new condition and ready to shoot In many cases if a part cannot be located, a new part can be made by our gunsmiths.
Q- I have an old firearm that I need to dispose of.  Can Ozarks Gunsmithing do that? A - Yes.  We can render the firearm un-shootable in conjunction with regulations by the BATFE.  Or we can pay you a sum of money and disassemble the firearm for parts to be used in our shop.
   
 Topic - Sights  
Q- I am having trouble seeing the sights on my firearm when target shooting or hunting.  What can be done to help me see better. A - We have a variety of sight options for most firearms.  Whether you require night sights, fiber optics, or highlighted iron sights out of the box or even custom sights to help you in your sight picture and sight/target acquisition.  Sometimes solutions are very simple such as enhanced "dots" on the sights or they can be complex such as combination tridium/fiber optics for a day/night solution.
Q- I have heard about Red Dot/Green Dot illuminators.  How do they work and do they really help? A - It's important to remember that most of these optic sights are not magnifying scopes, but rather optic projectors that illuminate some type of reticule shape that is placed over the target in the sight picture.  In most cases, these devices do require a "sighting" in process whether manual, optical, or both.
Q- Is there anything that can be done on low profile sights to help me see them better? A - Yes.  New products are available such as sight decals that can help you acquire a better sight picture on small front and low machined back sights.
Q- My firearm has iron/steel sights and I have difficulty seeing them in low light or target shooting conditions.  Is there anything that can be done. A - In most cases, yes.  Iron sights can be machined to accept various materials and coloring to help in sight acquisition.  In rare cases, the sights on certain firearms have been hardened and machining is not practical.  In these instances, new sights are recommended.
Q- What can be done to "zero in " my laser, red dot, or scope? A - At Ozarks Gunsmithing, we use the latest technology in bore sighting the firearm. Once the lasers have been aligned, we finish the process by firing the weapon to adjust to final target.
   
 Topic - Recoil (Kick)  
Q- I am having problems "racking" my firearm.  Is there anything that can be done? A - In most instances, yes.  A firearm can be modified with a lower rated recoil spring and along with other modifications can reduce the force required to move the slide.
Q- My firearm hurts my hand when I shoot. A - There are many variables that can contribute to hand or arm pain when shooting a firearm.  In some cases, the firearm bore is simply to big for your frame and mass. However, many times changes in the grip of your hand, a new set of grips for the firearm, a lower grained bullet and other methods can all help reduce the recoil pain.
Q- Can the recoil pain in my shoulder be reduced when shooting my rifle or shotgun? A - Yes.  Ozarks Gunsmithing can mount better stock butt pads that are built to absorb the bulk of the recoil of large bore rifles and shotguns.  We can modify the stock to maintain the current "length of pull" or we can add to the length of pull with thicker stock butt pads.
   
Ammo Feeding/Extraction  
Q- My hand gun is having problems pushing the bullet into the chamber.  What can I do? A - A large number of factors and combination of factors have to be considered on all feeding and extraction problems.  The first consideration is ammunition.  Not all ammo is the same. Not all brands are the same.  Between ammo changes to another brand or grain, thoroughly clean the barrel, chamber, feeding ramp, and magazine to make sure all is clean and ready for use.  If the problem persists, bring the firearm to Ozarks Gunsmithing for examination and determination of the problem.
Q- After I the shoot the firearm, the bullet casing will not "extract" or pull out of the chamber.  Can you help me? A - Yes.  This condition could potentially be an unsafe condition and should be handled with extreme care by the operator.  Never assume the bullet has fired and do assume the firearm is loaded in this condition.  If you can, keeping the muzzle of the firearm downrange, remove the magazine and engage the safety.  If possible, lock the slide back in the open condition.  If you are not experienced or have not dis-lodged a stuck round, bring the firearm to us immediately in an acceptable gun bag or case with the safety on and the bolt locked open.
Q- I shot my firearm and it made a "funny" sound and the bullet casing will not extract from the chamber.  What's wrong? A - You could have a dangerous condition called a "Squibb Load".  Do not attempt to fire the gun again. This condition could potentially be an unsafe condition and should be handled with extreme care by the operator.  Never assume the bullet has fired and do assume the firearm is loaded in this condition.   If you can, keeping the muzzle of the firearm downrange, remove the magazine and engage the safety.  If possible, lock the slide back in the open condition.  If you are not experienced or have not dis-lodged a stuck round, bring the firearm to us immediately in an acceptable gun bag or case with the safety on and the bolt locked open.
Q- When I shoot my firearm the next round gets stuck and will not advance into the chamber.  Can this be fixed? A- Yes. Because of the variables in shooting such as type of ammunition, quality of ammunition, and other factors, burrs and delaminated bass can develop. Continuing to shoot the firearm in this condition could cause damage.  In many cases burrs need to be removed and metal surfaces polished to remove the cause of lodging.
   
Safe Firearm  
Q- How do I know if my firearm is safe? A -  Whether your firearm is new or an old classic, the safety features of the firearm should be tested before each firing.  Consult the owner's manual or find an owner's manual on the internet and study each of the safety features built into the gun.  Test each feature as you review the manual.  In some instances the manual will ask you to "Dry Fire" the gun.  This means to pull the trigger in the cocked position.  This will generally not damage the gun, however, too much dry fire can and will damage the firing mechanism.  It's a good idea to purchase and use snap-caps (fake bullets) when dry firing a gun.
Q- I have a firearm that hasn't been fired for a long time.  Is there a safety issue that I need to be concerned about? A - Maybe. Depending upon the conditions of storage, state of the firearm when stored, humidity, and many other factors, firearms can develop rust and corrosion that should be examined by a gunsmith before firing.  At Ozarks Gunsmithing, we will totally break down the weapon, clean it, and visually examine the firearm for metal or wood fatigue.  We will also test fire the gun and check all safety features.
Q- What is a "Red Tag" that gun people refer to? A- A red tag will be issued and attached to a firearm that has been examined and deemed unsafe.  This tag is also recorded on the gunsmith documents and is available for examination by the BATFE.  A gunsmith has a duty to red tag any firearm that is found to be a danger when firing. Once the firearm is repaired the tag can be removed.
Q- I have never fired a gun.  Is there any training that I need to take before shooting. A- Absolutely.  Ozarks Gunsmithing has various programs available such as beginners shooting classes, CCW, Hunter Safety, and other training available to get you safely into the shooting sports.  Please contact us for further details.
   
Accurizing  
Q- I have heard people talking about getting their firearm accurized.  What is that about? A - Accurizing, if there is such a word, is the modern nomenclature for what we used to call "Tuning a firearm".  It generally refers to work to be done on a semi-automatic pistol but in some instances can apply to other types of firearms.  A qualified and experienced gunsmith can tune a firearm to shoot better, smoother, and more accurately. The process is rather extensive and does take a good amount of time, but well worth the time and expense.  Some firearms can be moderately tuned such as small composite handguns to extensive tuning such as 1911's and other metal firearms.
Q- Should I have my firearm accurized? A - Yes.  Firearm manufacturers mass produce guns on automated machines to increase their volume of production.  Variables affect the repeatability of the machining.  Dull or worn tooling. Changes in cutting fluids. Different operators and other factors affect tolerances of the product being produced.  A qualified gunsmith can many times compensate for these variables and tune your firearm to shoot in the most effective and accurate manner available. The old adage is "Make the gun more accurate than the shooter".
   
Storage  
Q- I have heard about long term storage of firearms.  Is there any preparation that should be done to my firearm? A - Yes.  If you are planning long term storage of a family heirloom or a collector gun, the firearm should be prepared for storage by a qualified gunsmith.  At OGC, we spend a great deal of time preparing the firearm with cleaning and treatments that will stop all rust and corrosion and we secure the firearm in a treated container that will insure safety and long term protection from humidity and moisture.
Q- Is there any special storage for firearms between hunting seasons? A - Yes.  At the minimum, the firearm should be thorough cleaned and lightly lubricated, it is also advisable to make sure all dirt, mud, blood, and other external contaminates be removed.  Blood can ruin the finish on a gun and begin a corrosive process that is difficult to stop.
Q- How should I store firearms in my home? A - In a safe or vault.  Be sure the safe has desiccants in all spaces and they are charged to remove moisture in the air. If a firearm safe is not available, be sure all trigger locks are in place and the keys are only available to those that have been trained to handle firearms. Lock the firearms in a closet.
   
Appraisals  
Q- Does my home owner's insurance cover my firearms in case of a fire or water damage? A - Generally, yes, but only to a certain level of coverage. Most policies only cover $3000 of firearms under a standard home owner's policy.  It is important for you to have an "official" appraisal on your firearms.  Once the appraisals are complete, you should discuss with your insurance company additional coverage that covers the appraised value of your firearms.
Q- I have an old firearm that I think is valuable.  Can you help me sell this firearm? A - Yes.  Ozarks Gunsmithing can market your firearm locally and nationally.  There is a commission involved once the firearm has been appraised, repaired, and sold. This commission will be discussed when you drop off the firearm for sale preparation.
Q- I am helping to sell an estate that has firearms.  Should I have an appraisal done? A - Absolutely.  Contact Ozarks Gunsmithing for an "On Site" appraisal on each firearm.  This appraisal will be invaluable to the auction company and the buyers of the firearms.
   
Fire Damage  
Q- I have had a fire in my home.  Can my firearms be restore? A- Possibly.  Stocks and grips can be replaced and parts can be replaced or restored.  The important factor is whether the action is workable.  Bring the fire damaged firearms to Ozarks Gunsmithing for close and careful evaluation and concise discussion concerning your restoration expectations.
Q- I had a fire in my home, but my firearms where in a safe.  Do I need to do anything with them before use? A - Yes.  To state the obvious, "Fires are hot".  Heat damage can be transferred into the safe when fire reaches certain temperatures for an extended period of time.  Before settling in any way on your insurance, bring the firearms to Ozarks Gunsmithing for evaluation.
Q- My basement flooded and all of my firearms have been exposed or immersed in water.  Can I just dry them off and they will be okay? A - Generally speaking, no.  Each firearm, must be completely disassembled and dried under low temperature air.  Each component must have all rust removed and re-coated as well as lubricated. Wood stocks can become water logged and be ruined.  This is a job for a qualified gunsmith.
   
Miscellaneous Questions  
Q- I have taken my firearm apart and now I can't get it back together.  Can you help me? A - Absolutely.  And without judgment.  Make sure all of the parts are packed and sealed in a plastic bag and bring them to Ozarks Gunsmithing.